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Chicago Quick Citation Guide

Chicago Quick Citation Guide

Quick Citation Guide [INFOGRAPHIC]

See below for accessible text version.

Quick Citation Guide: Chicago Style

Journal Articles

Note:

#. First-name Last-name, “Article Title: Subtitle,” Journal Title Volume#, no. Issue# (Month Year): page, https://doi.org/xx.xxxxxxxxxx. 

Shortened Note:

#. Last-name, “Shortened Title,” page. 

Bibliography:

Last-name, First-name. “Article Title: Subtitle.” Journal Title Volume#, no. Issue# (Month Year): Page Range. https://doi.org/xx.xxxxxxxxxx

Examples:

1. John M. Smith, “Bridging the Gap: Teaching Citations to College Students,” Journal of Higher Education 34, no. 5 (April 2020): 67, https://doi.org/10.1234/5678-9012.34.5.67.

4. Smith, “Bridging the Gap,” 67.

Smith, John M. “Bridging the Gap: Teaching Citations to College Students.” Journal of Higher Education 34, no. 5 (April 2020): 67-75. https//doi.org/10.1234/5678-9012.34.5.67.

Books

Note:

#. First-name Last-name and First-name Last-name, Title of Book: Subtitle (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page.

Shortened Note:

#. Last-name and Last-name, Shortened Title, page.

Bibliography:

Last-name, First-name and First-name Last-name. Title of Book: Subtitle. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

Examples:

2. Allison Rose Miller and Francis Baker, College: A History (Chicago: Lake University Press, 2007), 245. 

5. Miller and Baker, College, 245. 

Miller, Allison Rose and Francis Baker. College: A History. Chicago: Lake University Press, 2007.

Websites

Note:

#. First-name Last-name, “Page Title,” Title of Website, Publisher/Organization, published OR last modified OR accessed Month Day, Year, URL.

Shortened Note:

#. Last-name, “Page Title.” 

Bibliography:

Last-name, First-name. “Page Title.” Title of Website. Publisher/Organization. Published OR last modified OR accessed Month Day, Year, URL.

Examples:

3. Barbara Green, “Training Cats as Service Animals,” Medium, last modified November 28, 2014, https:// 

www.medium.com/trainingcats. 

6. Green, “Training Cats.” 

Green, Barbara G. “Training Cats as Service Animals.” Medium. Last modified November 28, 2014, https://www.medium.com/trainingcats. 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a DOI? 

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a unique string of characters used to identify a specific object (such as a journal article). It works like a barcode or URL. 

I can’t find a DOI. What should I use instead? 

If your journal article does not have a DOI, use the URL or the name of the database. 

When should I use shortened notes? 

The first note referring to a source should be a full note. Shortened notes are commonly used after that, but you may want to check with your instructor for preference. 

What should I do if I have multiple sources by the same author? 

Bibliographies are in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. In your bibliography, write the author’s name for the first entry. After that, use “---.” in place of the name. 

Need more help? Check out these guides: 

bit.ly/csm-chicago 

bit.ly/powl-chicago